JELLY ROLL

Although they were recorded in 1938, Jelly Roll Morton's unedited Library Of Congress recordings weren't released in their entirety for over fifty years, because some parts were just too damn dirty. Here are Jelly's most risqué songs, along with his tales of turn of the century New Orleans whorehouses, honky tonks, neighborhood parades and pimp attire. Not for the faint of heart.


1 The Dirty Dozen 4:30

This is "The Dirty Dozen." I really think this originated in Chicago. I heard this tune about 1908, when I happened to be in Chicago. It seems like Chicago had been, started to be, beginning to be a freakish center. It seems like that there was a lot of sayings about what the different people would be doing and the uncultured way and the sex appeal. So I heard that song then.

Oh you dirty motherfucker
You old cocksucker
You dirty son of a bitch
You bastard
You're everything
And yo' mammy don't wear no drawers
Yes, you did me this, you did me that
You did your father
You did your mother
You did everybody you come to
'Cause yo' mammy don't wear no drawers
That's the Dirty Dozen
Oh, the Dirty lovin' Dozen
The Dirty Dozen
Yes yo' mammy don't wear no drawers

This would be played in the houses in Chicago where they didn't mind about the language. Different places, sometimes I would visit these places. I was supposed to be one of the higher-ups. 'Course I'd sometimes I'd walk in and catch those things. It would be very embarrassing a lot of times, just the fact that old King Jelly Roll Morton was there. But I'd catch 'em and they wouldn't stop. Just keep on playing, you know. Some would care and some of 'em wouldn't. The gals, they would have their dress up way up to their ass. Just shakin' it and breakin' it. At that time they wore what you called—the ladies did—the split drawers. They'd just be shakin' it down. And some guy plunking on the piano, some rough looking guy, I wouldn't know who he was. They had several of 'em. And they'd sing it right over and over. They'd sing all kinds of verses. Some of them meant something, some of them didn't have any rhymes, and some did and so forth and on.

So I had a bitch
Wouldn't fuck me 'cause she had the itch
Yes she's my bitch
Oh yo' mammy wouldn't wear no drawers


The main theme was the mammy wouldn't wear no drawers, I thought it was a very disgusting mammy that wouldn't wear some underwear

Said you dirty motherfucker
You old cocksucker
You dirty son of a bitch
Oh everything you know
Oh you low bitch
Yes and everything you'll do
Mmm—yes—mmm, Lord
Yes you did
Yes you dirty bitch
Suck my prick
Oh eat me up
All that kind of stuff
Yes yo' mammy wouldn't wear no drawers
Said, look up bitch, you make me mad
I tell you 'bout the puppies that your sister had
Oh it was a fad
She fucked a hog
She fucked a dog
I know the dirty bitch would fuck a frog
'Cause yo' mammy don't wear no drawers
I went one day
Out to the lake
I seen your mammy
A-fuckin' a snake
All she tried, she tried to shake
All she shuck, shake on the cake
Mammy don't wear no drawers


2 Honky Tonk Blues 5:12

Tony [Jackson] used to play these things for what, in the sporting houses, for what they called the naked dances. Of course, they were naked dances all right because they absolutely was stripped. They was stripped. Of course, a naked dance was something that was supposed to be real art in New Orleans. Of course, there were many houses in New Orleans. The District there was considered the second to France, meaning the second greatest in the world, with extensions for blocks and blocks, on one side of the north side of Canal Street, which is supposed to be the highest class, although the highest class district ran from the lowest to the highest, meaning in price and caliber alike. We had a uptown side of the District, which was considered very big, but the price was pretty much even all the way round. And of course they turned out a many different artists in that section, but never the first-class artist because the money wasn 't there.

Alan Lomax: What were some of the tunes they used to play down the lower class districts?

Well, they played, for instance, around the honky tonks like Kaiser's honky tonk, and the Red Onion, and Spano's. Those were honky tonks. I'll tell you the fact about it, I don't think some of those places were swept up in months. And they'd have a gambling house in the back there. Of course, every place had a gambling house in New Orleans because the doors were taken off the saloons from one year to the other. Of course, I don't know any time that the racetracks ever closed down. They'd have a hundred days of races at the city park and the minute they'd close down, the next day they would be at the fairgrounds for a hundred days. So that would have a continuous racing season in New Orleans, which meant three hundred and sixty-five days a year. So gambling was always wide open. These honky tonks had these dirty, filthy places where they gambled, and they had a lot of rough people that would fight and do anything else. It was really dangerous to anybody that would go in there that didn't know what it was all about. And they always had an old broke-down piano with some inferior pianist. Well, the girls would start "Play me something there, boy, play me some blues." So they'd start playing in this way

I never believe in having one woman at a time
I never believe in having one woman at a time
I always have six, seven, eight or nine

Sometimes they'd have good looking, good looking women of all kind. Beautiful women. Some was ugly, very ugly. Some looked like they had lips looked like bumpers on a boxcar. I'm telling you, they had all kind of [wo]men dressed up. Rags, rags looked like ribbons on some of 'em. Some of 'em with big guns in their bosoms. There was a law in New Orleans that anybody could carry a gun if they wanted, almost. 'Course it was just about a ten dollar fine, didn't make very much difference. And if they fined you ten dollars, why, your sentence would be thirty days in jail. And possibly they'd put you in the market to clean up the markets in the morning. And most of the prisoners would always run away. So the thirty days didn't mean anything. Of course, it was a free and easy place. Everybody got along just the same. And that's the way it was. There wasn't no certain neighborhood for nobody to live in, only with the St. Charles Avenue district, which is considered the millionaire district. In fact it was. And that's how it was. Why, everybody just went anyplace that they wanted. Many times you would see some of those St. Charles Avenue bunch right in one of those honky tonks. They was around, they called theirselves slumming, I guess, but they was there, just the same. Nudging elbows with all the big bums.

3 I Thought I Heard Buddy Bolden Say 5:03

This is about one of the earliest blues. This, no doubt, is the earliest blues that was the real thing, that is a variation from the real barrelhouse blues. The composer was Buddy Bolden, the most powerful trumpet player I've ever heard or ever was known. The name of this was named by some old honky tonk people. While he played this, they sang a little theme to it. He was a favorite in New Orleans at the time.

I thought I heard Buddy Bolden say
Dirty nasty stinkin' butt, take it away
A dirty nasty stinkin' butt, take it away
Oh Mister Bolden, play
I thought I heard Bolden play
Dirty nasty stinkin' butt, take it away
A funky butt, stinky butt, take it away
And let Mister Bolden play

Oh, this number is, no doubt, about 1902.

Alan Lomax: Tell about Buddy Bolden playing trumpet.

Oh well, I tell you, Buddy was the most powerful man in the history. Why, Buddy Bolden would play sometimes at most of the rough places. For instance, the Masonic Hall on Perdido and Rampart, which is a very rough section. Sometimes he'd play in the Globe Hall. That's in the downtown section on St. Peter and St. Claude. Very, very rough place. Was very often you could hear of killings on top of killings. It wouldn't make any difference. Many and many a time myself, I went on Saturdays and Sundays and look in the morgue and see eight and ten men that was killed over Saturday night. It was nothing for eight or ten killings on Saturday night. Occasionally, Buddy Bolden used to play in the Jackson Hall, which was a much nicer hall on the corner of Jackson Avenue and Franklin in the Garden District. Occasionally, he would play in the Lincoln Park. Anytime they could get him, that's where they'd have him. That is, any of those halfway rough places. I used to go out to Lincoln Park, myself, when Buddy Bolden was out there, because I used to like to hear him play and outblow everybody. I thought he was good myself. Anytime there was a quiet night in the Lincoln Park, why, little places I used to hang out, a corner—what the boys used to call a hang out corner—on Jackson and South Robertson. It was about ten or twelve miles to the Lincoln Park. Anytime that he had a quiet night, all he did was take his trumpet and turn it towards the city. It was at least about ten or twelve miles from the corner that we hung out. Maybe an affair wasn't so well publicized, so in order to get it publicized in a few seconds, old Buddy would just take his big trumpet and just turn it around towards the city and blow this very tune that I'm talking about. In other words, the tune is "I Thought I Heard Buddy Bolden Say." And the whole town would know that Buddy was there. And in few seconds, why, the parks would start to gettin' filled. It was nothing for Buddy to blow any place that you could hear his horn during those times.

Alan Lomax: Did you hear him, where?

Oh, I heard him, I heard him up until he went to the crazy house. Later he went to the crazy house. But I had an opportunity to be in the Jackson Hall once when he was playing at some matinee, a holiday. And there was a man standing at the stationary bar. A little bitty short fellow, seemingly he was sick, had rheumatism. And a great big husky guy steps on his foot. And I was just between'em. And they got in an argument. And the little bitty guy didn't want to stand for it. Just pulled out a great big gun, almost as long as he was old. And shot. And if I hadn't pulled my stomach back, he'd a'shot me in the stomach. He killed this guy.

4 Make Me A Pallet On The Floor 16:26

This was one of the early blues that was in New Orleans, I guess many years before I was born. The title is "Make Me a Pallet on the Floor." A pallet is something that you get some quilts—in other words, it's a bed that's made on a floor without any four posters on'em. A pallet is something that I can define in New Orleans. For instance, you have company come to your home, and you haven't enough beds for you and your company. So what you do, in order to get'em to spend the night over, is to make yourself a pallet on the floor. So you'll say to your guests, you'll say to your guests "Well, you can stay overnight. It's perfectly all right. You're my friend, and I think it's rather dangerous—" During that time there was a lot of kidnappers in New Orleans, and there was no law against it, but only that you had the privilege to kill them. "It's rather dangerous, so maybe you better stay overnight and sleep in my bed, and I'll make me a pallet on the floor." So that's where the word "pallet" originated from. I don't think it's in the dictionary, though.

Alan Lomax: What about a woman when she has a man in her bed and she doesn't want her husband to smell him when he comes home? Isn't that where it comes from, too?

Well, I tell you when a woman has got a man, and she don't want her husband to know anything about it, it is very often—it has been known that from time and time again that the hard-working men in New Orleans has searched the women's underwear for stains and spots and so forth and so on. And sometimes they searched the bed for stains and spots, and so forth and so on. So in order to eliminate that—in that case, if they sure that the gentleman is on the job, so they make a pallet on the floor in that case also. So here's the words to some of this thing

Make me a pallet on your floor
Make me a pallet on your floor
Make me a pallet, babe, on your floor
So your man will never know
Are you sure your man is hard at work
Are you sure, sweet baby, your man is hard at work
Are you sure, sweet mama, babe, your man is at work
Don't you let that dirty, no-good son-of-a-bitch shirk
I wanna pitch some peter with you today, baby
I wanna pitch some peter with you today
I wanna pitch some peter, babe, with you today
So with your man you will not stay
Yes make me baby, a pallet on your floor, Lord, Lord, Lord, Lord
Make me a pallet on your floor
Make me a pallet, babe, so your man will never know
Make me a pallet, a pallet on your floor
Baby, I need some money to get my suit out of pawn
Baby, I need some money to get my suit out of pawn, babe
Bitch, if you don't give me some money to get my suit out of pawn
You wish the day that you never, never was born, Lord, Lord


This number's many years old

Yes, that bitch says, come here, you sweet bitch, let me get in your drawers

I'm remembering them things now

Come here, you sweet bitch, let me get in your drawers
Come here, you sweet bitch, gimme that pussy
Let me get in your drawers
I'm going to make you think you fucking with Santa Claus
You got the best cunt I ever had
I said, bitch, you got the best cunt I ever had
I said, sweet bitch, baby, you got the best cunt I ever had
Maybe it was that all I got was always bad
I put that bitch right on the stump
I set that bitch right on the stump, Lord, Lord, Lord
I set my bitch, babe, right on the stump
I screwed her'til her pussy stunk
If your man knew I had that big prick in you
If your man knew I had that big prick in you, Lord, Lord, Lord, Lord
If that man knew, babe, I had that big prick in you
What do you think that dirty no good son-of-a-bitch would do
I would tell him to kiss my fuckin' ass
I would tell him to kiss my fuckin' ass
I would tell him, baby, to kiss my fuckin' ass
Just as so long as you kissin' ass will last
Do you love me, baby, the way I grind you so
Do you love me, baby, the way I grind you so, Lord, Lord, Lord.
Do you love the way I grind you, and I grind you so
Tell me, baby, that your man will never know, Lord, Lord, Lord
Always make it, babe, that pallet on your floor, Lord, Lord, Lord, Lord
Make me a pallet on your floor, Lord, Lord, Lord, Lord
Make me a pallet, babe, on your floor
So that dirty, no-good son-of-a-bitch will never know
Anytime I fuck a bitch, I know she's my bitch
Anytime I fuck a bitch, I know she's my bitch
Just anytime I fuck my bitch, I know she's my bitch
But all I ask you to do, don't tell your dirty no good son of a bitch
Tell me, baby, don't you like the way I grind
Tell me, baby, don't you like the way I grind
Tell me, baby, babe, don't you like the way I grind
If you do, baby, let me get a little from behind
She said, baby, you know, I like the way your grind from my whine
She said, baby, you know, I like your grind from my whine
You know, I like your grindin', baby, from the way I whine
That's the reason why I'm gonna let you get a little bit from behind
Would you throw your legs way up in the air
Would you throw your legs way up in the air
Baby, throw your legs way up in the air
So I can take this big prick and put every bit right there


Yes this whiskey's good

Throw your legs up like a great church steeple
Throw your legs up like a great church steeple


Oh my goodness—whiskey

Throw your legs up like a church steeple, so I can think I'm fuckin' all the people
Throw your legs up like a great church steeple
Baby, it's been a pleasure in me fucking you
Baby, it's been a pleasure in me fucking you
Baby, it's been a pleasure, babe, in me fucking you
Baby, it's been a pleasure in me fucking you
Now, get me a towel, get it drippin' wet
Bring me a towel, bring it drippin' wet
Just bring me a towel, just bring it drippin' wet
You the fuckinest bitch, yes, baby, I ever met



5 Sporting Attire 4:22

All those boys in New Orleans dressed very well. But they all had the real tight trousers, those days. When they'd get into their trousers, why, they'd fit 'em like a sausage. Of course, Bertenards and Wagners were their tailors, and they know'd just how they wanted those clothes and they would fit 'em that way. I'm telling you, it was very, very seldom that you really could button the top button of a person's trousers. They had to leave the trousers' top buttons open. And they had the suspenders and of course, they didn't really need any suspenders because they was so tight fitting. And it was one of the fads that they would take one suspender down, as they would walk along with a walk that they had adopted from the river, which they call "shooting the agate." That was considered a big thing with some of the real illiterate women. If you could shoot a good agate, and had a nice high-class undershirt with a flannel shirt with the collar turned up, boy, I'm telling you, you liable to be able to get next to that broad. She liked that very much. But I tell you, it was a kind of a very mosey walk, with holding two fingers down of one finger on each hand, the front finger next to—in other words, the index finger. Yes, like that, you know, and with the arms stiffed out, you know, especially when they would be standing. And of course, if they was dressed up and you tried to talk to'em, they would find the nearest post—when they have a lot of creases in their clothes—or get to a house and they'd stiffen their arm out and hold theirself so far away, as just as far away as their arm would let 'em, so they wouldn't get any their clothes soiled. They was very particular about that. Especially some of them would wear overalls, overall jumpers, with a high class pair of trousers maybe cost 'em fifteen or eighteen or twenty dollars during those days.

And of course they wore the best of shoes. And not only shoes. They would never, nobody would wear a Stetson hat. In those days, myself, I thought I would die unless I had a hat with the emblem in it named Stetson. And I didn't rest until I got myself a Stetson hat and a pair of Edwin Clapp shoes. Of course, there was many of 'em that didn't wear ready-made shoes at all, during those times. They wore a lot of shoes what they call St. Louis flats and the Chicago flats. These shoes were made with cork soles on'em and no heels and would turn up in the front. A lot of times they would have different designs in the toes of the shoes, such as gamblers' designs, such as maybe a club, or a diamond, a heart, or a spade. I have heard later on, that even some of 'em had made arrangements to have some kind of electric lightbulbs in the shoes with a battery in their pocket and when they would get around some jane or something that was kind of simple and thought they could make her—as they call making 'em—why they'd press a button in their pocket and light up the little bitty bulb in the toe of their shoes.

And these boys were tremendous, and they were great sports. It was nothing like spending money that even worried their mind. If they didn't have it, somebody else had it and would spend it for 'em. It really was a miracle—[cough] that whiskey was certainly was wonderful, that's how some of the boys used to say, you know, when they'd get drunk, yes, indeed—it was a miracle to see how some of the boys lived. Today, why, they wouldn't even think of that particular type of living. But they didn't care. The fact they was all neat, and they all strived to at least have a Sunday suit. And without a Sunday suit, why, you didn't have anything. But not the kind of suits that you wear today. The boys wouldn't wear anything but a blue coat and some kind of a stripes. That was considered a suit. And if you really came up with all the goods, as they wore in the suit, why, you was considered out of line. There's a many time they would kid me and tell me, "Boy, you come from the country. Here you got trousers on the same as your coat. You're way out of line. There's no question about it."

6 See See Rider 1:43

See, see, rider, see what you have done
See, see, rider, see what you have done,
You made me like you, now your man done come
I want a gal that works in the white folks' yard
I want a gal, works in the white folks' yard
I want a gal that works in the white folks' yard


This is a verse I used to always like, see

I've got a mama, she lives right back of the jail, my my
I got a sweet mama, she lives right back of the jail
She's got on a sign on her window "Good pussy for sale"


7 Winin' Boy Blues 4:58

This happened to be one of my first tunes in the blues line, down in New Orleans, in the very early days when people first start to playing piano in that section. Of course, when a man played piano, the stamp was on him for life, the femininity stamp. And I didn't want that on, so of course when I did start to playing, the songs were kind of smutty a bit. Not so smutty, but something like this

I'm the winin' boy, don't deny my name
Oh, the winin' boy, don't deny my name
I'm the winin' boy, don't deny my name
I can pick it up and shake it like Stavin' Chain's
I'm the winin' boy, don't deny my name
I had that girl, I had her in the grass
I had that bitch, had her in the grass
Yes, baby, I had that bitch, had her in the grass
One day she got scared and a snake ran up her big ass
Yes, I'm the winin' boy, don't deny my name
I had that bitch, had her on the stump
I had that bitch, had her on the stump
I had that bitch and had her on the stump
I fucked her till her pussy stunk
I'm the winin' boy, don't deny my name
Nickel's worth of beefsteak and a dime's worth of lard, Lord, Lord, Lord
Nickel's worth of beefsteak and a dime's worth of lard
Yes, baby, nickel's worth of beefsteak, dime's worth of lard
I'm gonna salivate your pussy till my peter get hard
I'm the winin' boy, don't deny my name
I'm a poor boy, I'm long ways from home
I'm a poor boy, long, long ways from home
Long ways, I'm a poor boy, from home
I'm gonna try to never roam alone
I'm the winin' boy, don't deny my fucking name


8 Parades 5:13

They used to have clubs. They used to have the Broadway Swells and the High Arts and clubs all over the city. For instance, they had these clubs, there's always one would parade at least once a week. Every Sunday there was a parade in New Orleans. They'd have a great big band, and they would have horses, and they would have big streamers and things that cost plenty money. And one would outdo the other, try to outdo the other. They'd get the best bands, but they all had their streamers and their sashes for things like that. Why, they'd have it made at Betat's. Betat's was the best there was in the city. Every member in the organization that can afford, they always have at their home they have maybe a barrel of beer. Never a half a barrel, a real barrel. Of course, what I mean, they'd have a barrel of today. They'd have that and plenty sandwiches and a lot of whiskey and gin and so forth. Well, everybody in the neighborhoods of whichever these beers would be, or we'll say the grand salute, why they would have women on top of women, children and everybody and second lines just following the band and the parades. And of course, if they had ten fights that day, they didn't have many. And of course they would start on one side of the street, for instance, like the house is at your left-hand side, they would parade and go up the right-hand side and go all around to the next block, and then come down the left-hand side to get to the place. And there would be a grand opening right there, and the band would play in front of the place while everybody marched. And the boys would go in and, of course all the organizations would get their food and their drinks first. And they'd drink and have a hell of a time right there, and there might be a big fight before they got out of there, wouldn't be no argument. Then when they would get through, then the band would drink. They would have enough to drink at that time.

Alan Lomax: How would they talk in these fights, Jelly? What would they . . . give us an argument.

For instance, an argument, well I tell you it's a tough thing. One guy would say, "Get the hell outta here. Where you get that stuff at? You don't belong in here." Say, "Who said I don't? Why I live in this neighborhood." Say, "I don't give a damn if your mammy lives in here. You're gonna get out of here. If you don't, you black son of a bitch, I'll knock your brains out." And it would start on like that. And pretty soon fists would be flying. Sometimes it would require maybe a couple of ambulances to come around and dig up the people that was maybe cut or shot occasionally. This didn't happen all the time, but very, very seldom it didn't happen, see? The fact of it is, there always would be a fight. But there was no parade at no time that you couldn't find a knot on somebody's head where somebody had got hit with a stick or something. They had a tough little guy named Black Benny around there. He was really a tough little egg. He used to hung around the charcoal schooners at the head of the new basin. And anytime Benny was around it was a fight. He would really fight. He'd carry his broomstick, and he'd always want to be the grand marshal of the second line gang. And he finally later turned out to be somewhat of a musician, Black Benny, and Nicodemus also. They were terrible boys to get along with. Of course, sometimes they would get in an argument and there would never be a fight. They would get in an argument like this: Say, "Listen, don't cross this line." Say, "Why not?" "If you cross this line, this'll be your ass." "Whose ass?" "Your ass, that's whose ass it'll be." Say, "Well, let me tell you something. I don't give a damn about you and your whole goddamn family." Says, "If I hit you, your old double great-grandpa will feel it, see? I'm tellin' you. So don't you fool with me." And from then on it would go in an argument like that. And sometimes it would never, they'd never have a fight. And sometimes they'd wind up being friends. The second liners, their main instrument was a seven-shooter. They had those little bitty .22 seven shooters that shot seven times. I have seen many cases whereby that there'd be an argument and maybe a fellow would be right across the street. I've seen one case where a fellow shot seven times and each bullet hit this party and even didn't go into the skin. They certainly was bad pistols. But if a guy would shoot a pistol, one of those seven-shooters, nobody would take a chance on him because they'd known of many of'em to die from this. Well, razors was a very prevalent thing. You could see many razors. Since they didn't have the razor blades that they have today, like the safety razors, they had the regular old razors. And they would every home almost had one of those because New Orleans was a great place for barbers, and they had many barbers.

Alan Lomax: Why'd they use a razor in a fight, Jelly? They wouldn't kill a man, would they?

Well, they'd do anything as long as they could win. The main object is to win their fight. Whether it was a razor or whether it was a crowbar or not. It didn't make any difference.

Alan Lomax: Why'd they use razors more than knives?

Oh, well, a razor had, it's got a sharper edge on it. And of course it can cut you quicker. And anybody see a razor, they knows it means disaster. So a razor was something that I always moved from if I could see one myself, and I seen a many of'em.

9 If You Don't Shake 1:39

If you don't shake, don't get no cake
If you don't rock, don't get no cock
I said, if you don't shake, don't get no cake
If you don't rock, you don't get no cock
If you don't fuck, you don't have no luck
If you don't fuck, you don't have no luck
If you don't fuck, you don't have no luck
If you don't fuck, you don't have no luck


10 Call Of The Freaks 1:53

The name of this number is "Call Of The Freaks." Luis [Russell] came to New York some years ago after playing in King Oliver's band, from The Plantation in Chicago. [coughs] Oh, that whiskey is lovely! He wrote this number and called it "Call Of The Freaks," finding there were so many freaks in the city of New York that was so bold they would do anything for a dollar and a half. When he start to playing this thing, why, they would start walking. They all become to know the tune. They'd throw their hands way up high in the air and keep astride with the music, and walking. And of course they used to have a little verse in here that goes like this

Stick out your can, here come the garbage man
Stick out your can, here come the garbage man
Yes, stick out your can, here come the garbage man
Yes, stick out your can, here come the garbage man


The freaks would be marching, I'm telling you

Stick out your can, here come the garbage man

They'd stick theirself out in the rear

Yes, stick out your can, here come the garbage man

11 The Murder Ballad 28:44

I know you've got my man
I know you've got my man
Try to hold him if you can
I know that man don't want nobody but me
I know my man don't want nobody but me
If you don't believe it, I've got his room key
If you don't leave my fuckin' man alone
If you don't leave my fuckin' man alone
You won't know what way that you will go home
I'll cut your throat and drink your fuckin' blood like wine
Bitch, I'll cut your fuckin' throat, drink your blood like wine
Because I want you know, he's a man of mine
I've told you once, I'm not going to tell you any more
I tell you once, I'm not going to tell you any more
Right to the burying ground your big black ass will go
I'm going to tell him, I'm going to tell him'bout you
I'm going to tell him, I'm going to tell him'bout you
He'll either have me, or he won't have you too
Let me tell you one of the things that I've said
Let me tell you one of the things that I've said
The bitch that fucks my man, they'll find among the dead
I know you don't believe a thing that I say
I know you don't believe a thing that I say
If you don't leave my man alone, they'll find you every Decoration Day
Now, let me tell you, I don't want to tell you anymore
Let me tell you, don't want to tell you anymore
I catch you again, you be on that floor
If I see my man hanging round your door
If I see my man hanging round your door
If I see my man hanging round your door
Tell me, baby, what you doin' comin' out that bitch's house
Tell me, baby, what you doin' comin' out that bitch's house
I don't think she's no good, she's a great big louse
If she comes out here, that'll be her last time
What did you say
I said, if you come out here, that will be your last time
I'll teach you some lessons'bout fucking a man of mine
She said, I'm comin' out, I'd like to see someone stop me
She said, I'm comin' out, I'd like to see a bitch like you stop me
This ain't no slavery time, and I'm sure that I'm free
Yes, come on, bitch, your day has come
Yes, come on, bitch, your day has come
You fucked my man, but you will never fuck another one
She pulled out a pistol and shot her right in her eyes
She pulled out a pistol, shot her right in her eyes
She said, open your legs, you dirty bitch, I'm gonna shoot you between your thighs
She said, I killed that bitch because she fucked my man
She said, I killed that bitch because she fucked my man
She said, I killed that bitch'cause she fucked my man.
Policeman grabbed her and took her to jail
Policeman grabbed her and took her to jail
There was no one to go that poor gal's bail
She got in the jailhouse, they asked her, what you there for
Her inmates in the jailhouse: what are you here for
She said, I killed that bitch, that's what I'm here for
You a murderer, that's why you in jail
You a murderer, that's why you in jail
They had you pretty soon, they was on your trail


Oh that good whiskey makes me moan

Her trial came up, she was in front of the judge
Her trial come up, she went in front of the judge
Her attorney tried to give the judge a nudge.
The jury said, that girl is here
The jury said, that girl is here
The jury said, that murdering girl is here
The prosecutor said today, we dishing out years
Prosecutor said today, gal, we dishing out years
So be careful, don't have your fears
She said, Judge, I killed her'cause she had my man
She said, I killed her, because she had my man
I killed that bitch'cause she had my man
I'd rather be dead in my grave than hear that bitch havin' my sweet man
I'd rather be dead in grave, hear of her havin' my sweet man
I'd be dead in grave, let her have my sweet man
Jury found her guilty, she must go to jail
Jury found her guilty, she must go to jail
Up the river to Baton Rouge is her trail
Judge said fifty years for killing the woman that loved your man
Judge said fifty years for the woman that you killed lovin' your man
I wish I could help you, but I'm sure that I can't
So the poor gal was took away to that mournful jail
They brought that gal to the prison gates
They brought that gal to the prison gates
The keeper said hard labor is your task
Yes, the keeper said hard labor is your task
There's any more questions, don't you forget to ask
Your number is nine-ninety-three
Your prison number is nine-ninety-three
Start to workin' right under that great big tree
Coffee and bread is all you will get
Coffee and bread is all that you will get
Outside when it rain, you are sure to get wet
Don't you wish you had a let that woman had your man
Don't you wish you had let that woman have your man
There is lot of others that you could have your man
Time is comin' that a woman don't need no man, that's what she said when she was in jail
Time is comin' a woman won't need no man
You can get it all with your beautiful hand
Woman, woman, what have you been doin'
Woman, woman, what have you been doin'
This jailhouse has brought you way out to ruin
I can't have a man, so a woman is my next bet
I can't have a man in here, a woman is my next bet
She said to a good lookin' mama, baby, I'll get you yet
They went to sleep that night, the other gal crawled in her bed
They went to sleep that night, the other gal crawled in her bed
She says, I'm goin' to get some of this cunt, you bitch, I said
She said, gal, when I get through, you'll think I'm a man
She said, when I get through, you'll think that I'm a man
I'm goin' to fuck you, bitch, that you'll think I'm a man
She had a thing just the same as mine
She had a thing just the same as mine
We rubbed together, my, but it was fine
She said, I could learn to love you like I did that boy
She said, I could learn to love you like I did that boy
To play with my thing like that is pleasure like a toy
Every mornin' I want you give me some of this good cunt you've got
Every mornin' I want you to give me some of this good cunt you've got
Because it sure is fine, it is good and hot
I want you to screw me, screw me like a dog
Screw me behind, sweet bitch, screw me like a dog
When it gets good, I want to holler out like a hog
Years and years I could take a prick just like a mule
I could take a great big prick just like a great big mule
I found out what a big damn fool
I hustled night and day for that man of mine
I hustled day and night for that man of mine
Now I am through, I'm behind the walls for a long time
Ask my sister, please don't be like me
Ask my sister, please don't be like me
It's better to have had the things you don't want and go free
Now I'm back here for my natural life
I'm back here for my natural life
All I hate, I ain't got nothin' but my life
If the gods of heaven would show me how
If the gods of heaven would show me how
I could get away from here, I would leave right now
Prison walls isn't made for people to go
Prison walls ain't made for people to go
I killed that gal, but I never will know
I'm sorry, sorry, sorry to my heart
I'm sorry, babe, sorry to my heart
I'm sorry, that the argument ever did start
I'm in jail now and he's got him another bitch
Yes, I'm in jail and my man's got another bitch
I hate him, too, he's a dirty rotten son of a bitch
I pray and pray and pray and pray
I pray and pray and pray
That the Lord will show me another day
I jeopardized my life for that no good man
I jeopardized my life for that no good man
I jeopardized my life for that no good man
And at last there's nothing else for me to do
At last there's nothing else for me to do
I'm going to die in here, and I hope my man does, too
Goodbye to the world, I know I'm gone
Goodbye to the world, because I know I'm gone
And I'll be gone out a long, long, long
I hope heaven will be my home
I hope heaven will be my home
No more on this earth for me to roam
Sinners, sinners, sinners, won't you pray for me
Sinners, sinners, won't you pray for me
Pray for me to let the devil let me be
When I'm dead and dead way down in my grave
When I'm dead, dead way down in my grave
No more good peter of that man I'll crave
I won't be buried like all my family was
I won't be buried like my family was
I won't be buried like my family was
They will put me in a box in the prison yard
They will put me in a box in the prison yard
Not even a tombstone or not even a card
There won't be nobody following behind myself
There won't be nobody following, it will be me by myself
They'll lower me in the ground, I won't be on the shelf
If you get out of here, try to be a good girl, oh, I had to tell'em
Girls, if you get out of here, try to be a good girl
That's the only way you gonna wear your diamonds and pearls